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Nocturnal Babies

Nocturnal Babies

If your newborn is leaving you bleary eyed from sleep deprivation, it may help to know it’s normal for babies to mix up days and nights. Rest assured things will even out within a few months and, in the meantime, you may be able to build a foundation for better nighttime sleep by trying the following:

  • Gently talk and play with baby during day to increase daytime wakefulness
  • Allow naps – keeping baby awake during day does not help sleep at night
  • Put baby to sleep at night before he is overly tired
  • During nighttime feeds, keep things quiet, calm and efficient

Although it may be impossible for you to always nap when baby naps, try to take advantage of the opportunity when you can. Sleep helps the body heal after birth and can help you enjoy every minute with your little one – even if it’s the middle of the night.

https://www.healthychildren.org/English/ages-stages/baby/sleep/Pages/Reversing-Day-Night-Reversal.aspx

Protecting Baby Against Flu

Protecting Baby Against Flu

Babies younger than 6 months are at high risk for serious complications from the flu. Because they are too young to be vaccinated, consider the following steps to help protect your baby:

  • Get flu vaccine for yourself
  • Make sure caregivers and siblings older than 6 months are vaccinated
  • Keep baby away from others who are sick
  • Wash hands frequently and cover a cough
  • Clean frequently touched surfaces in home

If your child becomes ill, check with your pediatrician before giving over-the-counter medication. When recommended, measure liquid medication with provided syringe, dropper or measuring cup. If none comes with medication, request one from your pharmacist or pediatrician. Never use a kitchen spoon to measure medication

https://www.cdc.gov/flu/protect/infantcare.htm

https://www.healthychildren.org/English/safety-prevention/at-home/medication-safety/Pages/Using-Liquid-Medicines.aspx

Day-Care Essentials

Day-Care Essentials

If your child is about to start day care, it can be an exciting time but also a stressful time. Getting organized can help make the experience a little less anxiety-provoking for you and your child. First, label everything from blankets and clothing to sippy cups and diaper cream. Check with your day-care provider, but it’s likely you will need to send the following:

  • At least two complete changes of clothing including footwear if old enough to go outdoors
  • Extra blankets and sheets
  • Several bibs
  • Plastic bags for soiled clothes
  • Enough diapers, wipes, creams or ointments to cover a change every 2 hours or so
  • Comfort measures, such as a favorite stuffed animal, teething rings or pacifiers
  • Photos of you and your family to be displayed in your child’s crib

Remember to pack enough formula, expressed breast milk or baby food. Purified, steam-distilled water, such as Nursery®, can be sent to mix with formula and cereal and can be offered to children older than six months.

https://www.care.com/c/stories/3444/your-day-care-backpack/

https://www.childcarenetwork.com/Programs/Daycare_Baby_Packing_List

Preschool Bound

Preschool Bound

Mother was right and research shows children who eat a healthy breakfast concentrate and function better in school and have healthier body weights. Lunch is also important to sustain energy throughout the day and during afterschool activities. Here are some ideas that will increase the odds of your child eating what you pack:

  • Let your child pick out his own lunchbox or insulated lunch bag
  • Allow children to help prepare their own lunches the night before
  • Stock up with healthy options such as whole grain breads, almond butter, light tuna, lean meats, eggs, low-fat yogurt, cottage cheese and hummus
  • Guide children to pick a variety of foods from the five food groups which include vegetables, fruits, grains, low-fat dairy and protein

Calcium is important for growing children. Encourage them to drink milk with lunch by packing a container or sending milk money. Low-fat chocolate milk can be offered as a treat. If your child refuses to drink milk, offer 100% fruit juice fortified with calcium and Vitamin D. Also, pack a water bottle so your child learns to reach for water to quench thirst between meals.

https://www.healthychildren.org/English/healthy-living/nutrition/Pages/Breakfast-for-Learning.aspx

https://www.healthychildren.org/English/ages-stages/gradeschool/nutrition/Pages/Making-Healthy-Food-Choices.aspx

https://www.aap.org/en-us/about-the-aap/aap-press-room/news-features-and-safety-tips/pages/back-to-school-tips.aspx

https://www.aap.org/en-us/about-the-aap/aap-press-room/Pages/AAP-Recommends-Whole-Diet-Approach-to-Children's-Nutrition.aspx