mobile-menu

Newborns/Hydration

Newborns/Hydration

Water is one of the body's most essential nutrients; however, healthy babies do not need extra water for the first six months of life because it exists naturally in breast milk and is added to formula. Giving babies extra water can be dangerous as it can disturb the baby's electrolytes and potentially lead to seizures. So, when can baby start drinking water?

  • According to the American Academy of Pediatrics at about six months, most babies are eating solids, and it's okay to introduce a few sips of water at this time
  • If it's hot outside, you can give baby a little extra water, but always check with your pediatrician as to how much
  • After the first year, the recommendation for toddlers is about five and a half cups of water each day, but that includes water from all food and beverages

And, remember, the American Academy of Pediatrics recommends breast milk or formula as baby's sole source of nutrition for the first six months of life and a major source of nutrition for the first year. So, at six months, give baby a few sips, but don’t fill her up on water.

http://www.eatright.org/resource/health/pregnancy/breast-feeding/do-babies-need-extra-water

https://www.healthychildren.org/English/ages-stages/baby/feeding-nutrition/Pages/How-to-Safely-Prepare-Formula-with-Water.aspx

https://www.healthychildren.org/English/ages-stages/baby/feeding-nutrition/Pages/default.aspx

http://nationalacademies.org/hmd/~/media/Files/Activity%20Files/Nutrition/DRI-Tables/9_Electrolytes_Water%20Summary.pdf?la=en